Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Of tartans and beards

For a pattern, plaid has been remarkably successful. It’s one of the most widespread, recognizable and ubiquitous designs in the world, coming in almost every color and shade under the sun.
Technically, plaid isn’t the pattern’s proper name. That honor goes to the word “tartan,” which was first used to describe the individual colors and patterns used to decorate the clothes of different Scottish clans. 

Tartan is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tartan patterns.

Contemporary thinking on plaid tends to lie in one of two camps: those who see it as a simple, stylish essential, and those who denounce it as a sartorial symbol of that shudder-inducing neologism, the ‘hipster’.
But to dismiss plaid as just another tired trend is to do it a disservice, as its history and longevity suggest otherwise. Whether it’s in the form of a classic flannel jacket, a preppy button-down shirt or subtly situated within a suit, we’re firmly planting our flag in the pro-plaid camp.

Sanky Is Seen Here In A Marks And Spencer Tartan Plaid Shirt Paired With His Grey Stone Wash Denims From Splash And Vest From Koovs.

Coming next with an amazing blospost soon! See you soon <3

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